A collection of relics from the start of Queen Victoria's reign to the beginning of the First World War.

 

Architecture
Art
Cinema
Ephemera
Fashion
Literature
Maps
Messages
Music
Occult
Religion
Royalty
Belle Époque, &c. {1837—1914}

The Eclipse: Courtship of the Sun and Moon, 1907

(via theclockworkaesthete)

notaboutnormal:

Lord and Lady Curzon, Viceroy and Vicereine of India, enter Delhi with sepoy escort, circa 1902 

notaboutnormal:

Lord and Lady Curzon, Viceroy and Vicereine of India, enter Delhi with sepoy escort, circa 1902 

(Source: collective-history, via captain-finland)

omgthatartifact:

Desk and Chair
Carlo Bugatti, 1890
1stdibs.com

omgthatartifact:

Desk and Chair

Carlo Bugatti, 1890

1stdibs.com

unhistorical:

August 17, 1908: Fantasmagorie is released.

This French animated film is widely considered the first animated cartoon, and it is one of the oldest examples of traditional animation. It was created by Émile Cohl, a Parisian cartoonist who made 700 drawings in total for his (relatively short) animation, and it screened for the first time in Paris’s Théâtre du Gymnase. Fantasmagorie lacked any sort of coherent narrative structure, consisting mostly of surreal images (meant to resemble chalkboard drawings) melting and morphing into each other - but it was a milestone in animation history. 

The name Fantasmagorie refers to the form of theatre popular in the 19th century known as phantasmagoria

Alphabets used in Europe in 1901

Alphabets used in Europe in 1901

"Bloody" Brigham Young, here bearing a distinct similarity to Javier Bardem’s character inNo Country for Old Men, is perhaps best remembered among non-Mormons for his legacy of brutality. A proud polygamist, Young is largely responsible for turning Mormonism from a much maligned New Age interpretation of Christianity into a militarized, highly insular sect which was unofficially at war with the United States of America.
1857’s infamous Mountain Meadow Massacre took place in a pre-apocalyptic atmosphere. President Buchanan had sent federal troops west in order to determine to what extent Mormon claims of sovereignty were a reality. Mormons, long used to popular persecution, having been uprooted for various reasons from New York, Illinous, and Missouri, feared that the United States government was preparing for all-out war. Young did what he could to nurture paranoid sentiment, rallying his followers ever further into a stance of antagonism towards the United States.
When a wagon train of pioneers, mainly from Arkansas, stopped in Salt Lake City on their way to California, its members could not have known that they would be raising the suspicions of the locals. As they arrived in Mountain Meadows, they decided to stop to rest, and were attacked by a Mormon militia whose members had disguised themselves as Indians. A five-day siege ensued, after which the emigrants, low on supplies, surrendered, with the militia promising to keep them alive and safe effectively as prisoners of war.
These promises were an absolute fallacy, and, in order to prevent the existence of any witnesses, the militiamen massacred about 120 men, women, and children. Seventeen children, all under the age of 7, were spared, with the rationale being that they were too young to testify that their group had been attacked by Mormons.

"Bloody" Brigham Young, here bearing a distinct similarity to Javier Bardem’s character inNo Country for Old Men, is perhaps best remembered among non-Mormons for his legacy of brutality. A proud polygamist, Young is largely responsible for turning Mormonism from a much maligned New Age interpretation of Christianity into a militarized, highly insular sect which was unofficially at war with the United States of America.

1857’s infamous Mountain Meadow Massacre took place in a pre-apocalyptic atmosphere. President Buchanan had sent federal troops west in order to determine to what extent Mormon claims of sovereignty were a reality. Mormons, long used to popular persecution, having been uprooted for various reasons from New York, Illinous, and Missouri, feared that the United States government was preparing for all-out war. Young did what he could to nurture paranoid sentiment, rallying his followers ever further into a stance of antagonism towards the United States.

When a wagon train of pioneers, mainly from Arkansas, stopped in Salt Lake City on their way to California, its members could not have known that they would be raising the suspicions of the locals. As they arrived in Mountain Meadows, they decided to stop to rest, and were attacked by a Mormon militia whose members had disguised themselves as Indians. A five-day siege ensued, after which the emigrants, low on supplies, surrendered, with the militia promising to keep them alive and safe effectively as prisoners of war.

These promises were an absolute fallacy, and, in order to prevent the existence of any witnesses, the militiamen massacred about 120 men, women, and children. Seventeen children, all under the age of 7, were spared, with the rationale being that they were too young to testify that their group had been attacked by Mormons.

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fuckyeahvintageillustration:

Two posters by Will Bradley advertising ‘Victor Bicycles’.

Source

lostsplendor:

Men in Vests and Neckties, c. 1834 via NYPL

lostsplendor:

Men in Vests and Neckties, c. 1834 via NYPL

tea-and-skeletons:

Borley RectoryThe derelict building in the photo above is not a place to enter lightly. Though the small village of Borley, near Sudbury, UK, is not the sort of place one would associate with ghosts, it has a dreadful reputation because it was the site of the infamous Borley Rectory, reputedly the ‘Most Haunted House in England’.
Built in 1863 for the Reverend Henry Bull, it sits on the site of an ancient monastery. The ghost of a mournful nun who patrolled the so-called ‘Nun’s Walk’ had often been seen there.
An old story claimed that she had fallen in love with a monk from the Borley Monastery – to much outrage – and the two had tried to elope together but had been quickly tracked down. The monk was executed and the nun bricked up in the cellars of the monastic buildings.

tea-and-skeletons:

Borley Rectory

The derelict building in the photo above is not a place to enter lightly. Though the small village of Borley, near Sudbury, UK, is not the sort of place one would associate with ghosts, it has a dreadful reputation because it was the site of the infamous Borley Rectory, reputedly the ‘Most Haunted House in England’.

Built in 1863 for the Reverend Henry Bull, it sits on the site of an ancient monastery. The ghost of a mournful nun who patrolled the so-called ‘Nun’s Walk’ had often been seen there.

An old story claimed that she had fallen in love with a monk from the Borley Monastery – to much outrage – and the two had tried to elope together but had been quickly tracked down. The monk was executed and the nun bricked up in the cellars of the monastic buildings.

(via truthofmasks)